The Beginning of Rich Festivals of India

The Beginning of Rich Festivals of India

The Beginning of Rich Festivals of India

India is a colurful country with full of colourful festivals. Usually every day there is a festive day according to india calendar. October and November months are celebrated as a series of festivals. It starts with Navratri and ends with divali. People enjoy this festival with shopping, sweets, cleaning the entire home, shops and offices or even their workplaces. The markets are house-packed during this festive season.

 The Navratri, (Sanskrit: “nine nights”) in full Sharad Navratri; Navratri also spelled Navaratri; also called Durga Puja, in Hinduism, major festival held in honour of the divine feminine. Navratri occurs over 9 days during the month of Ashvin, or Ashvina. It often ends with the Dussehra (also called Vijayadashami) celebration on the 10th day. In some parts of India, Dussehra is considered a focal point of the festival, making it effectively span 10 days instead of 9. Additionally, as Navratri depends on the lunar calendar, in some years it may be celebrated for 8 days, with Dussehra on the 9th. There are four similar festivals, also called Navratri, which are held at various stages of the year; however, the early autumn festival, also called Sharad Navratri, is the most significant.

Dussehra, also known as Vijayadashmi, is a major Indian festival celebrated on the tenth day of Ashvin month according to the Hindu calendar. The day culminates a 9 day fasting period of Navratri in the Hindu culture. The day also coincides with immersion of the idol of Goddess Durga. The day is celebrated to commemorate the killing of Ravana by Lord Rama. The day also celebrates the killing of demon Mahishasur by Goddess Durga. Dussehra celebration spreads the message of the victory of good over sin.

Ever since, the day is celebrated with great fervor and energy. There are a lot of mythological tales associated with the day. According to Ramayana,

Ravana was killed by Lord Rama on this day as revenge against the cruel act of kidnapping Goddess Sita by the former. Mythology also has it that Goddess Durga killed demon Mahishasura after a long spell of cruelty and oppression by Mahishasura.

Diwali, or Dipawali, is India’s biggest and most important holiday of the year. The festival gets its name from the row (avali) of clay lamps (deepa) that Indians light outside their homes to symbolize the inner light that protects from spiritual darkness. This festival is as important to Hindus as the Christmas holiday is to Christians. Over the centuries, Diwali has become a national festival that is enjoyed by most Indians regardless of faith: Hindus, Jains, Buddhists, and Sikhs.

On the second day, people decorate their homes with clay lamps and create design patterns called rangoli on the floor using colored powders or sand.

The third day is the main day of the festival when families gather together for Lakshmi puja, a prayer to Goddess Lakshmi followed by mouth-watering feasts and firework festivities.

Diwali is now celebrated in the most part of the world for its rich and festive taste.

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